CONVERSATION STARTERS ON ETHICS AND FINANCE

There’s been a loud silence these years since the economic downturn of 2008 the space where leaders of the financial industry might have weighed in on the human and moral reckoning of that turning. But it’s true, too, that the stark language of victims versus villains of recent years has not invited some of the very voices we need into robust civic reflection. A frank public conversation with leaders in finance on ethics in the present and future of their industry.

CENTERING CONVERSATIONS

A public conversation on Nantucket Island with leaders in finance, on ethics and the future - with investment banker and generosity network founder Jeffrey Walker, former Barclays CEO Bob Diamond.

A public conversation on Nantucket Island with leaders in finance, on ethics and the future - with investment banker and generosity network founder Jeffrey Walker, former Barclays CEO Bob Diamond.

VOICES FROM THE CONVERSATION

Jeffrey Walker is the former CEO of CCMP Capital. His book is The Generosity Network.

Jeffrey Walker is the former CEO of CCMP Capital. His book is The Generosity Network.

 
Bob Diamond is the former CEO of Barclays bank and now heads Atlas Merchant Capital. 

Bob Diamond is the former CEO of Barclays bank and now heads Atlas Merchant Capital

Former corporate CEO and board member of Goldman Sachs Bill George on the ethical line of business and the incumbency of financial leaders to rebuild what has been lost after the financial meltdown of 2008.  

Former corporate CEO and board member of Goldman Sachs Bill George on the ethical line of business and the incumbency of financial leaders to rebuild what has been lost after the financial meltdown of 2008.

 

 
Bill George is a former corporate CEO and board member of Goldman Sachs

Bill George is a former corporate CEO and board member of Goldman Sachs

 

GUIDING QUESTIONS

What does restoring trust between the financial industry and the U.S. culture look like?

Can banks be good citizens?

How can we rediscover the balance of doing good and good business?

How do we work on the right financial laws that have input from the community, from research, and firms themselves?

How do you get performance over time that's consistently good and built on relationships?

 

RECOMMENDED READING

Marketing Guru Seth Godin — Does Corporate Trust Have to be an Oxymoron?

Technologist Prabhu Guptara — The Gods of Business Slideshow

KINDRED CONVERSATIONS

from the Repossessing Virtue Project

In late 2008, we began an exploration of the spiritual and moral aspects of the economic downturn and flaws that have been exposed in financial systems. Online and on air, we generated a challenging, edifying, cross-cultural conversation called Repossessing Virtue. We continue to look for fresh thinking and language for talking about what has happened and why — not just in terms of financial tools and strategies but in terms of personal conscience and values. We're looking for practical resources for individual and communal evaluation and renewal, moving forward from this crisis.

 

As the economy has faltered, we've grasped to understand what went wrong and how. But beneath economic explanations and remedies, these questions compel us to other kinds of reflection, on qualities of human nature that ultimately determine economies and markets, on qualities of humanity that we want to cultivate in ourselves and our children. How will we redefine what matters in this moment and who will we be for each other?

As the economy has faltered, we've grasped to understand what went wrong and how. But beneath economic explanations and remedies, these questions compel us to other kinds of reflection, on qualities of human nature that ultimately determine economies and markets, on qualities of humanity that we want to cultivate in ourselves and our children. How will we redefine what matters in this moment and who will we be for each other?

We explore human and spiritual aspects of economic downturn with a wise public intellectual of our time, the Quaker author and educator Parker Palmer. He works with people from all walks of life at the intersection of spiritual, professional, and social change, and stresses the need to acknowledge the inner life of human beings as a source of reality and power.

We explore human and spiritual aspects of economic downturn with a wise public intellectual of our time, the Quaker author and educator Parker Palmer. He works with people from all walks of life at the intersection of spiritual, professional, and social change, and stresses the need to acknowledge the inner life of human beings as a source of reality and power.

In 2009, we asked our listeners to join the conversation. Many are grappling with the shame that comes in American culture with the loss of a job, and many are seeking community in old places and new. For some, economic instability — a kind of life on the edge — is not new. They've been cultivating virtues of patience, self-examination, service and good humor that might help us all.

In 2009, we asked our listeners to join the conversation. Many are grappling with the shame that comes in American culture with the loss of a job, and many are seeking community in old places and new. For some, economic instability — a kind of life on the edge — is not new. They've been cultivating virtues of patience, self-examination, service and good humor that might help us all.